All posts tagged: african american

2014 Photoshoot examines contrary social representations of the black male body

PORTRAITS CHALLENGE REPRESENTATIONS OF THE BLACK MALE BODY (NSFW) You write that the black male body is “the most hated body in popular American culture and/or society.” Could you elaborate on the roots and consequences of this prejudice? “Pathology is something that many people feel is too over-talked to discuss—there is so much stigma around it (even in 2014!), but pathology is real because it is what many people navigate the world through. I think an excellent example comes from bell hooks’s essay “Eating The Other.” She talks about the pathology of the black male body and its relationship to primitiveness, slavery, labor and pain. She also links pathology to commercialism and how blackness is fetishized and hyper-eroticized in mainstream media. This creates a false idea of otherness; of black bodies being hypersexual, hyperviolent and hyperaggressive (she links hypersexuality to violence and primitiveness). There are many layers, and pathology’s relationship to athleticism and sports culture is a fascinating one. “As far as consequences go, there are too many. I think the reaction to Ferguson is …

Black to the future:Naturism,nudism, and clothes free living African Americans and the clothes free community

“Being a naturist, I chose to experience my nudity outdoors in natural environments and indoors within communities of diverse people in non sexual environments. For me, it’s a choice to openly and intimately experience myself in every season. I openly and intimately embrace all of the elements: air, fire, water, earth. And I commit to maintaining practices of self-love and self-acceptance through all the seasons of my life. I chose to have my first naturist experience during a time in my life when I was consciously seeking and exploring personal, spiritual and tangible liberation and freedom.” Jasmine Burems – Honey & Gold – The Goddess Lifestyle So where do we stand? What is the current state of the relationship between African-Americans and the clothes free community? Is the clothes free community and the practice of clothes free living an inherently a white European practice? I wish I could say the state of the union was strong. However, despite the previously unknown to be rich historical connection between people of African descent and naturism/clothes free living, …

There are negros among us – Naturism, nudism and clothes free living African Americans and the clothes free community

NATURISM IS FOR “every body,” as the saying goes, and its offer of freedom, health, and social equality are inherently available to any and all. Yet naturism in North America remains blindingly white. – Mark Storey Nude & Natural 25.3 Described as the golden age of nudism by some the post World War II era of nudism wasn’t so golden for African-Americans in the U.S.  The African-American experience in the clothes free community reflected very much what was happening in the rest of society. The racial prejudice and segregation present in the broader society was present in the U.S. naturist/nudist subculture. Perhaps inspired by the experiences of “negro” GIs returning from WWII in Europe or buoyed by the ideals of emerging civil rights movement, the African-Americans actively sought to take part in naturist/nudist/ communities, clubs and camps. This interest was significant enough to permit a report on the phenomenon by the prestigious African-American magazine Ebony. This influx of African-Americans seeking to participate in the practice by joining the increasing number of nudist club, camps and …

I’m living Clothes Free and here’s why

I have always had a hate relationship with clothes and I think it stems from being self-conscious about my body when I was younger. I always thought I was fat even though I wasn’t. When I got to high school and joined the dance team, I lost a lot of weight, but I still was not comfortable. I grew up where what you wore defined who you were as a person. Everything had to be name brand, matched and the latest style. I felt like no matter what I wore, I never fit in. In my first year of college, I wore as little clothing as possible not because I wanted to be clothes free, but because I was seeking a certain type of male attention. I later found out that no matter what I wore, I would get the same attention. My college years involved a lot of soul-searching and self-discovery that did not reveal itself until a couple of years ago. I have always hated standing in my closet searching for something to …

recent conversations with women in my life

 The more I talk with women in my world about clothes free life, the more I learn that many of them already spend much of their time clothes free, if anything at home. These conversations made me think that when we talk about causes and movements and so forth, we can’t just say that only people who openly shout about their naturist or clothes free lives count. I have seen that nature of commentary quite often, and it is wonderful if that is true to a person and works for them and others in their environment. At the same time, that is not necessarily how all people engage their lives generally (not just with regard to clothes freedom). What I am actually finding, particularly in my connections with the women in my life, is that it is less about shouting anything from the rooftops to the infinite public, and more about opening up in intimate one-on-one conversations.  Recently I opened up to a new friend about my clothes free life. As I shared with her in the conversation, she opened up and told me …

The African Continent Naturism, Nudism and clothes free living -African Americans and the clothes free community

“Until lions have their own historians, tales of the hunt shall always glorify the hunter” – African Proverb This is the first in a four-part series of posts about the presence of African-Americans and people of African descent in the clothes free community for Black History Month. This series will look at a brief history of naturism, nudism, and clothes free living in connection with  African-Americans and their participation in the clothes free community. Hopefully, this series will accomplish two things; deepen the awareness of the African American community about the historical practice naturism among people of African ancestry. Also to encourage dialogue between the African-American community and the clothes free community about the lingering limiting factors that impact their participation. The history In order to understand the current state of African-Americans and naturism, nudism and clothes free living, we have to look back at the history of naturism, nudity and clothes free life among people from the African continent. With few exceptions most examinations of the history of naturism in the clothes free community start with …

Naturism nudism and clothes free living African Americans and the clothes free community

For black history month we will be publishing a four-part series the Naturism, Nudism, and Clothes Free Living – African-Americans & the clothes free community. Each week in February we will explore a different aspects of naturism, nudity and clothes free life in the African-American context. We will start on the African continent and move to the intersection of native Africans with Europeans and Americans of european descent. Then explore the place of African-Americans in the height of the naturist/nudist and finish with a look at present day. This online magazine/site is one of the only naturist/clothes free sites to present the African-American perspective in the clothes free community. Photo credits Far right : Noire 3000 studios http://www.noire3000studios.com/

Artist uses nude images to raise consciousness about race

Woman Poses Nude in the Middle of Wall Street Visual artist Nona Faustine, a Brooklyn native, has published a series of provocative photos to underscore New York’s role in the Transatlantic Slave Trade. The photo series, titled “White Shoes,” features Faustine posing nude on Wall Street, at City Hall, in a Brooklyn cemetery, and at various other New York landmarks where African slaves arrived, lived, and died in America. A graduate of NYU’s School of Visual Arts, Faustine cites enslaved African “model” Saartjie Baartman and black American photographer Carrie Mae Weems as major influences and inspirations for her “White Shoes” project. “Through self-portraiture,” Faustine explains, “I explore issues about the black body within photography and history.“   read more from Complex see photos in the “white shoes series”

Records and Conversations

Sometimes I wonder to myself, “Why am I posting naked pictures of myself on the internet?” Am I some kind of exhibitionist? Do I want attention? What’s the point?” NO. I realized during a writing reflection session that I am sharing my naked soul to create a personal history and to be part of something great.